Kalama Community Wildlife Conservancy, Final Report 2008

/ / / Kalama Community Wildlife Conservancy, Final Report 2008

KALAMA COMMUNITY WILDLIFE CONSERVANCY
FINAL REPORT 2008

KALAMA COMMUNITY WILDLIFE CONSERVANCY

KALAMA COMMUNITY WILDLIFE CONSERVANCY

By JOHN LEPARPORIT
PROJECT MANAGER.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Kalama community wildlife conservancies wish to sincerely acknowledge the support that the
conservancy has received for the year 2008 from International Elephant Foundation. We are also
grateful to the following partners:
• St Louis Zoo Wild care institute
• Northern Range Land Trust
• Lewa wildlife conservancy
• Arid lands Resource Management project-Samburu
• African wildlife foundation
• Grevy Zebra Trust
• Kenya Wildlife Service
• Martha Fischer family
• Marwell Conservation
• Old Boma
• Carman Trails Elementary school-USA
• Princeton University
• Community members and Leaders.
Thank you all for the support we received from you and God bless you!

INTRODUCTION
Kalama conservancy is among the community conservancies which are actively involved in the
conservation of the elephants of Northern Kenya. This report covers the period between January
to December 2008. Under this period the project experienced hardships in especially grazing
management due to influx of livestock from sera areas. This was mainly caused by the lack of
security between the neighbouring communities. During the last quarter of the year the project
experienced acute shortage of water however, we managed to achieve the following programmes.

SECURITY AND WILDLIFE MONITORING

The conservancy in collaboration with Northern Rangelands Trust (NRT) has established a standardized
system of community based monitoring to detect changes and trends, and relative abundance of elephants
and other wildlife species. They also monitor the number of security breaches on a daily basis while on
routine foot patrols which meets the information needs of the conservancy management. Our scouts have
actually mastered the use of GPS and translate the same information into a database and this has really
helped the conservancy to know the abundance of wildlife and their location due to the computer training
that a number of our scouts received through NRT. During the year there were forty-one incidences
regarding cattle rustling and highway banditry where the project was actively involved in solving the situation.

Above: a Kenya wildlife service personnel treats a grevy zebra foal while one of our
senior scouts examines an injured gerunuk

The table below shows the number of individual sightings for the whole year.

RANGELAND AND LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT

The rangeland rehabilitation programme has continued this year and a 400 acre plot of acacia refficien
was cleared and grass planted. This undesirable bush and ford have replaced natural grasses providing
little nutrition for both livestock and wildlife.

The project grazing committees have had a number of training sessions and exchange visits to Shompole,
Wamba and Isiolo on rangeland management and conflict resolutions and to share experiences. This has
enabled the committee to do the following:

Set up and enforce grazing regulations
Retract human settlement in the conservation area
Control livestock grazing in the conservation area
Handle wildlife and human conflict matters
Reports matters of security
Organize communities meetings for conservation awareness creation.
Arbitrate between the warring communities for peaceful co-existence


Community members clearing acacia refficins

SCHOOL BASED CONSERVATION EDUCATION

The key to long term success and sustainability of the conservancy will depend on active participation
and empowerment of the people. The conservancy is therefore committed to enhance the participation
of community members of all categories – men, women and young people in order to create a positive
mindset towards conservation. The project has managed to organise the following activities within the
neighbouring schools;

Bird watching – provision of bird’s books
Provision of stationeries and informative materials such as video
cassette
Documentation of club activities
Support educational tours to nearby conservation areas
Support club’s quarterly competitions and interactions.
Support the youth group recreational activities.
HIV+AIDS awareness campaigns

Environmental clubs photo album (efforts to document clubs activities)

INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND
MAINTAINACE

Kalama community has continued to improve its infrastructure by achieving the
following:
• Grading of airstrip-installation of windsock
• Repair and painting of staff houses/office
• Construction of rock catchments at the lodge site
• Completion of water pan at the lodge area

Completed rock catchments near the eco-lodge


FINANCIAL REPORT

During the year 2008, Kalama conservancy received USD 13,896 which was spent as
per the table below:

CHALLENGES

Despite the above achievements the project has also faced a number of challenges,
these include:
• Security problems
• Water shortages – water demand has continued to increase due to increase of
wildlife and human population.
• High demand of vehicle use by community members
• Over reliance of Donor funding
• Grazing management controls
• Drought

WAY FORWARD

To overcome the above challenges, the project intends to do the following:
• Continue to monitor and protect elephants’ corridor within Kalama conservancy
• Enhance community participation in conservation efforts
• Continue conflict resolution and management within the region.
• Rehabilitate the water system
• Involve the community in cost sharing of vehicle running costs
• Enhance and promote gender knowledge
• Source funding for purchase of the lodge
• Promotion of gender equity in management of natural resources

CONCLUSION
I wish to sincerely thank International Elephant Foundation for their generous donation which
has greatly helped in conservation of the northern Kenya elephants. I also wish to thank the
management of Kalama conservancy for their efforts in conservation initiatives.
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2018-04-01T16:28:06+00:00